Thomas Arthur Schaefer
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Sunday, October 02, 2005

Epitome Of Cool Inscribed On The Back Of Ray Johnson Head

DRESS COUNTDOWN: 25 DAYS

OFFICIAL CLOSING COUNTDOWN: 17 DAYS

I've been telling myself this fact for weeks, but today I finally saw it come to fruition — 'Paper is nothing like fabric and can not be treated in the same manner'. I'm building the jacket based on a pattern from 1950. It will work out fine and save me a lot of time in terms of how to interconnect the different pieces... the difficulty comes when you have to get paper to round corners and flow around things like fabric does. The simple matter of fact is that paper is paper and will do as paper wants to do. I'm probably going to have to add more darting to certain portions of the jacket to allow the paper to react to the body like fabric would. Only I'll probably leave it as open-darting vs. closed-darting. Of course none of these sewing terms are being correctly used, but I'm working with paper and I'm going to evolve/twist/interpret terms (like darting) to mean what I want them to mean. So when I say open-darting I mean darts ( a tapered tuck stitched into a garment in order to shape it) that are simple inward folds without stitching or in this case glue.
I cut the butcher paper material this afternoon, to connect the body portion of the jacket. The sleeves will be next and will need serious non-fabric based alterations to work in the paper world. The pattern for the collar is going to have to be totally redesigned to match the North Korean military look. Pockets from this pattern are also out the window, as the don't match what North is doing. The basic structure for the jacket is all I really needed.
The only thing I'm going to have to begin to assemble, not knowing whether I'll really want it is the jackets 'front facing' and 'front interfacing' pieces... again these may be things that make more sense for fabric, but may become useless and redundant when building out of paper.


FRONT pieces


BACK & SIDE BACK pieces


BACK & SIDE BACK pinned together

An important thing to remember when working with paper and attempting to shape and fold it to the body, is the power of scoring the paper with a razor-blade. Just enough to allow the paper to fold over accurately with out creating a false fold line and thus an unremovable crease (ruining the paper). The score is your greatest ally... especially when darting the paper.
The other important thing is the bone folder... if you want sharp folds, you have to have it. I used my bone folder religiously when I was constructing experimental and hand-made books back in 98'. I still have it and it's a god-send for this project.

DO NOT FORGET JIM ROSENQUISTS PAPER SUIT FROM 1966.

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